Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from chubachus  10 notes
chubachus:

Samuel Weaver (holding open book at right) supervising African American laborers in the exhumation of the grave of a presumably Union soldier who died in Hanover, Pennsylvania, 1864. The soldier’s remains were to be relocated to Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg.
Source.

chubachus:

Samuel Weaver (holding open book at right) supervising African American laborers in the exhumation of the grave of a presumably Union soldier who died in Hanover, Pennsylvania, 1864. The soldier’s remains were to be relocated to Soldiers’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg.

Source.

Reblogged from chubachus  3 notes
chubachus:

Photograph said to be an example of an excursion party whose civilian and military members who would attend battles and watch them from a distance during the early days of the Civil War, c. 1861.

chubachus:

Photograph said to be an example of an excursion party whose civilian and military members who would attend battles and watch them from a distance during the early days of the Civil War, c. 1861.

Confederate soldiers were disparate for food at times. This recipe is from Phoebe Yates Pember, superintendent of one of the wings of Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Virginia.It is in her book, “A Southern Woman’s Story”, published 1879, page. 104..Roasted Rat"The rat must be skinned, cleaned, his head cut off and his body laid upon a square board, the legs stretched to their full extent and secured upon it with small tacks, then baste with bacon fat and roast before a good fire quickly like canvasback ducks."
From Civil War Talk

Confederate soldiers were disparate for food at times. This recipe is from Phoebe Yates Pember, superintendent of one of the wings of Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Virginia.

It is in her book, “A Southern Woman’s Story”, published 1879, page. 104.

.Roasted Rat

"The rat must be skinned, cleaned, his head cut off and his body laid upon a square board, the legs stretched to their full extent and secured upon it with small tacks, then baste with bacon fat and roast before a good fire quickly like canvasback ducks."

From Civil War Talk

Reblogged from mistycabin  5 notes
chubachus:

Group portrait of Confederate POWs and a northern civilian during their incarceration in the Union prison at Fort Delaware, April 1864. The bearded man sitting in the center not wearing a uniform is a Presbyterian minister named Issac W. K. Handy from Delaware who was imprisoned for criticizing the government.
Source.
More information.

chubachus:

Group portrait of Confederate POWs and a northern civilian during their incarceration in the Union prison at Fort Delaware, April 1864. The bearded man sitting in the center not wearing a uniform is a Presbyterian minister named Issac W. K. Handy from Delaware who was imprisoned for criticizing the government.

Source.

More information.

Improved Order of Red Men

A fraternity that traces its origins back to 1765 and is descended from the Sons of Liberty. These patriots concealed their identities and worked “underground” to help establish freedom and liberty in the early Colonies. They patterned themselves after the great Iroquois Confederacy and its democratic governing body. Their system, with elected representatives to govern tribal councils, had been in existence for several centuries.

After the War of 1812 the name was changed to the Society of Red Men and in 1834 to the Improved Order of Red Men. They kept the customs and terminology of Native Americans as a basic part of the fraternity.  The Improved Order of Red Men (IORM) is similar in many ways to other major fraternal organizations in the United States.

http://redmen.org/redmen/info/

Their rituals and regalia are modeled after those used by Native Americans. The organization claimed a membership of about half a million in 1935, but has declined to less than 38,000.

Notable Members:

Theodore Roosevelt

Warren G. Harding

Franklin D. Roosevelt

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Improved_Order_of_Red_Men

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  115 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Food- Legend Of The Hushpuppy (or cornbread ball)
To a far greater degree than anyone realizes, several of the most important food dishes that the Southeastern Indians live on today is the “soul food” eaten by both black and white Southerners. Indian boiled cornbread is present in Southern cuisine as “corn meal dumplings”, … and as “hush puppies”, -Hudson, Charles (1976). “A Conquered People”. The Southeastern Indians. The University of Tennessee Press. pp. 498–499.
The first recorded reference to the word “hush-puppy” dates to 1899
In the old south Hushpuppies are said to have gotten their name from the dredging of the catfish that would have been thrown out. Being thrifty, the cook from the house would send them down the slave quarters and the women added a little milk, egg and onion and fried it up. It is said they were tossed to the dogs to keep them quiet while the food was being transferred from the pot to the table. “Hush puppy! Hush puppy!”
Another theory for Hushpuppy history- Confederate soldiers would sit beside a campfire preparing their meals. If they detected Yankee soldiers approaching, they would toss their yapping dogs some of the fried cornmeal balls with the command, “Hush puppies!”
http://www.savannahclassics.com/fun_facts.html
Kitchen Sink Hush Puppies, Pepper Jack and Ham, Deep fried Cornbread.http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/2012/04/17/kitchen-sink-hush-puppies/

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Food- Legend Of The Hushpuppy (or cornbread ball)

To a far greater degree than anyone realizes, several of the most important food dishes that the Southeastern Indians live on today is the “soul food” eaten by both black and white Southerners. Indian boiled cornbread is present in Southern cuisine as “corn meal dumplings”, … and as “hush puppies”, -Hudson, Charles (1976). “A Conquered People”. The Southeastern Indians. The University of Tennessee Press. pp. 498–499.

  • The first recorded reference to the word “hush-puppy” dates to 1899
  • In the old south Hushpuppies are said to have gotten their name from the dredging of the catfish that would have been thrown out. Being thrifty, the cook from the house would send them down the slave quarters and the women added a little milk, egg and onion and fried it up. It is said they were tossed to the dogs to keep them quiet while the food was being transferred from the pot to the table. “Hush puppy! Hush puppy!”
  • Another theory for Hushpuppy history- Confederate soldiers would sit beside a campfire preparing their meals. If they detected Yankee soldiers approaching, they would toss their yapping dogs some of the fried cornmeal balls with the command, “Hush puppies!”

http://www.savannahclassics.com/fun_facts.html

Kitchen Sink Hush Puppies, Pepper Jack and Ham, Deep fried Cornbread.http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/2012/04/17/kitchen-sink-hush-puppies/

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  43 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Ladies Of Pennsylvania Sewing A Large Flag For State Troops At The Front
The patriotism of northern women was frequently contrasted to the fierce chauvinism of female Confederates, as one Yankee primly defended: “The feelings of Northern women are rather deep than violent; their sense of duty is quiet and constant rather than headlong or impetuous impulse.” This notion of female devotion was integral to the Union image of itself. Volunteerism as the secular faith swept men into the army and women into war work, including the nursing corps.
http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/4/sec2.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

Ladies Of Pennsylvania Sewing A Large Flag For State Troops At The Front

The patriotism of northern women was frequently contrasted to the fierce chauvinism of female Confederates, as one Yankee primly defended: “The feelings of Northern women are rather deep than violent; their sense of duty is quiet and constant rather than headlong or impetuous impulse.” This notion of female devotion was integral to the Union image of itself. Volunteerism as the secular faith swept men into the army and women into war work, including the nursing corps.

http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/4/sec2.htm