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Reblogged from americana-plus  1,312 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Last Civil War Vet116-yr-old Walter Williams, last Civil War vet, in his bed w. a cigar in his mouth & Confederate flag, Amer. flag & uniform hanging on wall behind him. Location: Houston, TX, USDate taken: 1959 Photographer: Thomas D. Mcavoy
He said he had been a foragemaster in Hood’s Brigade and Quantrill’s Raiders. He would have been eight years old at the time he said he had joined the Confederate Army. When he died in 1959 in Houston, Texas, at the reported age of 117, Ulysses S. Grant III, chairman of the Civil War Centennial, said the death was an occasion for national mourning. Photo from Keith Cornelius.
 

thecivilwarparlor:

Last Civil War Vet
116-yr-old Walter Williams, last Civil War vet, in his bed w. a cigar in his mouth & Confederate flag, Amer. flag & uniform hanging on wall behind him. Location: Houston, TX, US
Date taken: 1959 Photographer: Thomas D. Mcavoy

He said he had been a foragemaster in Hood’s Brigade and Quantrill’s Raiders. He would have been eight years old at the time he said he had joined the Confederate Army. When he died in 1959 in Houston, Texas, at the reported age of 117, Ulysses S. Grant III, chairman of the Civil War Centennial, said the death was an occasion for national mourning. Photo from Keith Cornelius.

 


General Lee and his Confederate officers in their first meeting since Appomattox, taken at White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, in August 1869, where they met to discuss “the orphaned children of the Lost Cause”. Left to right standing: General James Conner, General Martin Witherspoon Gary, General John B. Magruder, General Robert D. Lilley, General P. G. T. Beauregard, General Alexander Lawton, General Henry A. Wise, General Joseph Lancaster Brent Left to right seated: Blacque Bey (Turkish Minister to the United States), General Robert E. Lee, Philanthropist George Peabody, Philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran, James Lyons (Virginia)
 


From: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/new-robert-e-lee-and-generals-in-1869.88536/
General Lee and his Confederate officers in their first meeting since Appomattox, taken at White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, in August 1869, where they met to discuss “the orphaned children of the Lost Cause”. Left to right standing: General James Conner, General Martin Witherspoon Gary, General John B. Magruder, General Robert D. Lilley, General P. G. T. Beauregard, General Alexander Lawton, General Henry A. Wise, General Joseph Lancaster Brent Left to right seated: Blacque Bey (Turkish Minister to the United States), General Robert E. Lee, Philanthropist George Peabody, Philanthropist William Wilson Corcoran, James Lyons (Virginia)
 
From: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/new-robert-e-lee-and-generals-in-1869.88536/
Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  48 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Poet Warrior - William Haines Lytle
Celebrated American poet before the Civil War. Lytle’s most famous poem, “Antony and Cleopatra” (published in 1857), was beloved by both North and South in antebellum America
He was a politician in Ohio, renowned poet, and military officer in the Army during both the Mexican American War and The Civil War, where he was killed in action as a brigadier general. 
Lytle was mortally wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga in Georgia while leading a counterattack on horseback. Once his identity was known, respectful Confederates placed a guard around his body, and many recited his poetry over their evening campfires.
His funeral was held in the early afternoon at Christ Church on Fourth Street in Cincinnati. So many people lined the streets that the funeral cortege did not reach Spring Grove Cemetery until dusk. Lytle’s monument, one of the most impressive ones there, is near the entrance to the cemetery. The alleged shooter of Lytle was never discovered, and to this day has never been discovered, all that is known is that the shooter was a Confederate sniper using a Whitworth .45 caliber percussion rifle.
According to history presented to The Daughters of The Confederacy, the shooter was Hillary Garrison Waldrep of Company B of the 16th Alabama Regiment of Infantry. In order to make the shot that was purportedly approved personally by General Bragg, Waldrep had to adjust the sights on his rifle for 200 yards beyond where they usually were. According to the account, once General Lytle fell to the ground, his horse was spooked and ran toward the Confederate soldiers. Bragg gave Hillary Garrison Waldrep General Lytle’s horse, bed-roll and equipment. Waldrep later sold the horse for $100.
Taken From Antony and Cleopatra-Lytle’s most famous poem, 1858:
I am dying, Egypt, dying;
Hark! the insulting foeman’s cry;
They are coming; quick, my falchion!
Let me front them ere I die.
Ah, no more amid the battle
Shall my heart exulting swell;
Isis and Osiris guard thee, —
Cleopatra, Rome, farewell!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Haines_Lytle
http://waroftherebellion.com/images/lyttle2.jpg

thecivilwarparlor:

Poet Warrior - William Haines Lytle

Celebrated American poet before the Civil War. Lytle’s most famous poem, “Antony and Cleopatra” (published in 1857), was beloved by both North and South in antebellum America

He was a politician in Ohio, renowned poet, and military officer in the Army during both the Mexican American War and The Civil War, where he was killed in action as a brigadier general.

Lytle was mortally wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga in Georgia while leading a counterattack on horseback. Once his identity was known, respectful Confederates placed a guard around his body, and many recited his poetry over their evening campfires.

His funeral was held in the early afternoon at Christ Church on Fourth Street in Cincinnati. So many people lined the streets that the funeral cortege did not reach Spring Grove Cemetery until dusk. Lytle’s monument, one of the most impressive ones there, is near the entrance to the cemetery. The alleged shooter of Lytle was never discovered, and to this day has never been discovered, all that is known is that the shooter was a Confederate sniper using a Whitworth .45 caliber percussion rifle.

According to history presented to The Daughters of The Confederacy, the shooter was Hillary Garrison Waldrep of Company B of the 16th Alabama Regiment of Infantry. In order to make the shot that was purportedly approved personally by General Bragg, Waldrep had to adjust the sights on his rifle for 200 yards beyond where they usually were. According to the account, once General Lytle fell to the ground, his horse was spooked and ran toward the Confederate soldiers. Bragg gave Hillary Garrison Waldrep General Lytle’s horse, bed-roll and equipment. Waldrep later sold the horse for $100.

Taken From Antony and Cleopatra-Lytle’s most famous poem, 1858:

I am dying, Egypt, dying;

Hark! the insulting foeman’s cry;

They are coming; quick, my falchion!

Let me front them ere I die.

Ah, no more amid the battle

Shall my heart exulting swell;

Isis and Osiris guard thee, —

Cleopatra, Rome, farewell!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Haines_Lytle

http://waroftherebellion.com/images/lyttle2.jpg

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  100 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Warrior-Poet William Haines Lytle- He Had A Major Reputation In The 1800’s Heyday Of Poetry. He died at Chickamauga, left behind on the battle field where Confederate soldiers actually protected his body 
Confederate officer, Colonel Wm. Miller Owen, in his reminiscences of the civil war, relates that, while riding over the battlefield of Chickamauga, on September 20, 1863, he came upon the body of General Lytle, which he recognized as that of an old friend. He says: “A confederate soldier was standing guard over the body. Dismounting, I asked the man his instructions, and he replied, ‘I am here to take charge of this body, and to allow no one to touch it.’
His poetry was loved by both Yankees and Southerners, especially “Antony and Cleopatra” They read his poetry aloud in a makeshift tribute. They found some of his latest verses on his body including these lines he had written for his sisters:“In vain for me the applause of men,The Laurel won by sword or pen,But for the hope, so dear and sweet,To lay my trophies at your feet.”


‘Tis Only Once We Love By William Haines


The heart that throbbed at Glory’s voice And followed in her train, Although in sloth it slumbers long, May wake to life again. But ah! when once true love has bloomed, As many a heart can prove, The fragrance wasted ne’er returns— ‘Tis only once we love.
I tread the sunny paths of life, ‘Mid beauty’s proud array, But the spell that lent a charm to all Has mist-like passed away. No more the thrill from mingled pulse The eloquent low sigh, Nor the unbidden tear of joy That trembled in the eye.
Yet ofttimes in my early dreams, From some enchanted isle, Comes one with her soft, winning voice And the old gladsome smile,
And hand in hand we wander on Through violet-bordered glades, Till with the night’s starred legions bright The joyous vision fades.
Ah! sadly pass the hours away When that sweet light departs, Which fair as dawn on Eden rose With rapture on our hearts. And many a blossom fair is culled As through the world we rove; But the fairest is the rarest flower. ‘Tis only once we love.
Lytle never married, and left no direct descendants.
Photo Brady National Photographic Art Gallery (Washington, D.C.) info wiki and http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/lp-2001/lytle3.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Warrior-Poet William Haines Lytle- He Had A Major Reputation In The 1800’s Heyday Of Poetry. He died at Chickamauga, left behind on the battle field where Confederate soldiers actually protected his body

Confederate officer, Colonel Wm. Miller Owen, in his reminiscences of the civil war, relates that, while riding over the battlefield of Chickamauga, on September 20, 1863, he came upon the body of General Lytle, which he recognized as that of an old friend. He says: “A confederate soldier was standing guard over the body. Dismounting, I asked the man his instructions, and he replied, ‘I am here to take charge of this body, and to allow no one to touch it.’

His poetry was loved by both Yankees and Southerners, especially “Antony and Cleopatra” They read his poetry aloud in a makeshift tribute. They found some of his latest verses on his body including these lines he had written for his sisters:

“In vain for me the applause of men,
The Laurel won by sword or pen,
But for the hope, so dear and sweet,
To lay my trophies at your feet.”

Tis Only Once We Love By William Haines

The heart that throbbed at Glory’s voice
And followed in her train,
Although in sloth it slumbers long,
May wake to life again.
But ah! when once true love has bloomed,
As many a heart can prove,
The fragrance wasted ne’er returns—
‘Tis only once we love.

I tread the sunny paths of life,
‘Mid beauty’s proud array,
But the spell that lent a charm to all
Has mist-like passed away.
No more the thrill from mingled pulse
The eloquent low sigh,
Nor the unbidden tear of joy
That trembled in the eye.

Yet ofttimes in my early dreams,
From some enchanted isle,
Comes one with her soft, winning voice
And the old gladsome smile,

And hand in hand we wander on
Through violet-bordered glades,
Till with the night’s starred legions bright
The joyous vision fades.

Ah! sadly pass the hours away
When that sweet light departs,
Which fair as dawn on Eden rose
With rapture on our hearts.
And many a blossom fair is culled
As through the world we rove;
But the fairest is the rarest flower.
‘Tis only once we love.

Lytle never married, and left no direct descendants.

Photo Brady National Photographic Art Gallery (Washington, D.C.) info wiki and http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/lp-2001/lytle3.html

Reblogged from revoltedstates  10 notes
revoltedstates:

"Private Williams, Co. A , and group, 83rd Regt., 23rd Inf., N.Y." Plenty of guns and poses here, but the barefoot boy in the corner just chilling, smoking his pipe, and reading a book is the best part…if you don’t agree, we can’t be friends anymore and I’m shutting this whole thing down because that kid’s an allegory for my soul and I really hope he made it through the war alright because he was also a very real dude. Source: NARA.

revoltedstates:

"Private Williams, Co. A , and group, 83rd Regt., 23rd Inf., N.Y." Plenty of guns and poses here, but the barefoot boy in the corner just chilling, smoking his pipe, and reading a book is the best part…if you don’t agree, we can’t be friends anymore and I’m shutting this whole thing down because that kid’s an allegory for my soul and I really hope he made it through the war alright because he was also a very real dude. Source: NARA.

The cannon was given to the state museum system in 1908. It’s been sitting in front of the Cabildo, pointing towards Jackson Square for more than a century. Recently the maintenance department decided to look inside, guess what they found? They couldn’t believe it, there was a cannon ball at least 150 years old, down the muzzle. 

"You could see the part, like part of the sphere of the cannonball down there," said Maintenance Director Wade Levy. "I thought oh my God, I couldn’t believe it was a cannonball."

They found an 18-pound cannonball inside it. It was split in half, but the cannon was also used by the Confederate Army during the Civil War, which made cannonballs this way, then welded them. 

http://www.wwltv.com/news/local/Action-Report-Big-Surprise-Found-when-Cannon-At-Cabildo-Restored-270380991.html

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  104 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Charles Longfellow- Son Of Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
In 1863, he ran off to enlist as a private in the Union Army during the Civil War, and eventually received a commission as a lieutenant in a cavalry regiment. Miraculously, he survived a bout with malaria and what could have been a mortal gun shot wound to his back, which he received while on campaign in Virginia. The bullet traveled across his back, nicked his spine, and exited under his right shoulder. He missed being paralyzed by less than an inch.
He knew his father disapproved of him fighting, but went anyway. He wrote a letter to his father saying, “I have tried to resist the temptation of going without your leave but cannot any longer.”
Charles Longfellow went on to become one of the earliest American tourists in Japan. His journal offers a rare picture of the Asian nation opening up to the world after centuries of isolation. Charles was independently wealthy with inheritances from his grandfather, Nathan Appleton and his mother, and spent the rest of his life traveling the world. He died in 1893, in Cambridge from pneumonia and is buried in the family vault in Mt. Auburn Cemetery. The souvenirs of his travels and his uniforms and accoutrements from his service in the Union Army are at Longfellow House in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
http://www.friendsoflongfellowhouse.org/2008/12/charles-appleton-longfellow-twenty.html
http://www.nps.gov/long/historyculture/charles-longfellow.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

Charles Longfellow- Son Of Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In 1863, he ran off to enlist as a private in the Union Army during the Civil War, and eventually received a commission as a lieutenant in a cavalry regiment. Miraculously, he survived a bout with malaria and what could have been a mortal gun shot wound to his back, which he received while on campaign in Virginia. The bullet traveled across his back, nicked his spine, and exited under his right shoulder. He missed being paralyzed by less than an inch.

He knew his father disapproved of him fighting, but went anyway. He wrote a letter to his father saying, “I have tried to resist the temptation of going without your leave but cannot any longer.”

Charles Longfellow went on to become one of the earliest American tourists in Japan. His journal offers a rare picture of the Asian nation opening up to the world after centuries of isolation. Charles was independently wealthy with inheritances from his grandfather, Nathan Appleton and his mother, and spent the rest of his life traveling the world. He died in 1893, in Cambridge from pneumonia and is buried in the family vault in Mt. Auburn Cemetery. The souvenirs of his travels and his uniforms and accoutrements from his service in the Union Army are at Longfellow House in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

http://www.friendsoflongfellowhouse.org/2008/12/charles-appleton-longfellow-twenty.html

http://www.nps.gov/long/historyculture/charles-longfellow.htm