Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  44 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Ladies In Camp, ca. 1862
National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.
When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, women turned their attention, and their considerable energy, to the conflict. In both the North and the South, women gathered in aid societies, circulated petitions, and, at home, took over the masculine duties of running the household. While these activities kept the women at home busy, many women wanted to support their causes closer to the battlefield. Rather than face low-paying, grueling factory work or even prostitution, poorer women followed their husbands, brothers or fathers to camp.
Sara M. Evans Born for Liberty. (New York: Free Press Paperbacks, 1997) 

thecivilwarparlor:

Ladies In Camp, ca. 1862

National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer.

When the American Civil War broke out in 1861, women turned their attention, and their considerable energy, to the conflict. In both the North and the South, women gathered in aid societies, circulated petitions, and, at home, took over the masculine duties of running the household. While these activities kept the women at home busy, many women wanted to support their causes closer to the battlefield. Rather than face low-paying, grueling factory work or even prostitution, poorer women followed their husbands, brothers or fathers to camp.

Sara M. Evans Born for Liberty. (New York: Free Press Paperbacks, 1997) 

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  79 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Soldiers’ Aid Society in Cleveland from the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History
A group of women from various Cleveland churches first met as the Ladies Aid Society on  April 20,1861. and organized a “blanket raid” to collect quilts and blankets for troops being mustered at Camp Taylor, one of the 7 camps in Cleveland.  The official war was new and the ladies had no idea what was ahead of them. Six months later the group joined with other benevolent groups to form the Soldiers’ Aid Society of Northern Ohio.  Financed by private donations, the organization cared for the sick and wounded, provided ambulance and hospital service, solicited clothing and medical supplies, and sent food to soldiers in the field throughout the Civil War. The society established a distribution center at 95 Bank (W. 6th) St.
In 1863 the Ladies Aid Society of Pleasant Township in Knox County reported they had collected the following for the war effort: 
shirts, 91;
drawers, 65 pairs;
pocket handkerchiefs, 138;
pillow slips, 42;
pillows, 10;
sheets, 6;
towels, 35;
socks, 9 pairs;
mittens, 2 pairs;
compresses, 32 rolls;
bandages, 59 rolls;
5 bundles of papers and magazines,
1 pound of hops,
53 pads,
13 fans,
2 neckties,
3 boxes 2 rolls and 1 sack of lint,
32 pounds of crackers,
6 pounds of dry toast,
10 dozen pickles,
4 quarts of vinegar,
18 jugs of canned fruit and pickles,
42 bushels of apples,
7 quarts of dried peaches,
23 quarts of elderberries,
14 quarts of dried cherries,
5 quarts of sweet corn,
3 quarts canned fruit,
13 bushels of potatoes,
2$ bushels of onions,
1 bushel of beets, and
one bushel of cabbage.
http://www.rosecransheadquarters.org/LadiesAid/Sanitation.htm#soldiers Aid

thecivilwarparlor:

Soldiers’ Aid Society in Cleveland from the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History

A group of women from various Cleveland churches first met as the Ladies Aid Society on  April 20,1861. and organized a “blanket raid” to collect quilts and blankets for troops being mustered at Camp Taylor, one of the 7 camps in Cleveland.  The official war was new and the ladies had no idea what was ahead of them. Six months later the group joined with other benevolent groups to form the Soldiers’ Aid Society of Northern Ohio.  Financed by private donations, the organization cared for the sick and wounded, provided ambulance and hospital service, solicited clothing and medical supplies, and sent food to soldiers in the field throughout the Civil War. The society established a distribution center at 95 Bank (W. 6th) St.

In 1863 the Ladies Aid Society of Pleasant Township in Knox County reported they had collected the following for the war effort: 

  • shirts, 91;
  • drawers, 65 pairs;
  • pocket handkerchiefs, 138;
  • pillow slips, 42;
  • pillows, 10;
  • sheets, 6;
  • towels, 35;
  • socks, 9 pairs;
  • mittens, 2 pairs;
  • compresses, 32 rolls;
  • bandages, 59 rolls;
  • 5 bundles of papers and magazines,
  • 1 pound of hops,
  • 53 pads,
  • 13 fans,
  • 2 neckties,
  • 3 boxes 2 rolls and 1 sack of lint,
  • 32 pounds of crackers,
  • 6 pounds of dry toast,
  • 10 dozen pickles,
  • 4 quarts of vinegar,
  • 18 jugs of canned fruit and pickles,
  • 42 bushels of apples,
  • 7 quarts of dried peaches,
  • 23 quarts of elderberries,
  • 14 quarts of dried cherries,
  • 5 quarts of sweet corn,
  • 3 quarts canned fruit,
  • 13 bushels of potatoes,
  • 2$ bushels of onions,
  • 1 bushel of beets, and
  • one bushel of cabbage.

http://www.rosecransheadquarters.org/LadiesAid/Sanitation.htm#soldiers Aid

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  58 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Buffalo Soldiers-Painting By Don Stivers 
Troop A Tenth Cavalry led by Captain Nicholas A. Nolan at the Battle of Rattlesnake Springs,Texas August 6, 1880. Rattlesnake Springs is 40 miles north of present day Van Horn, Texas.
Troopers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry served with honor and distinction in the protection of settlers and stage coaches, stringing of telegraph lines and the mapping and exploration of Texas.
When the Plains Indians first saw the men of the 10th Cavalry wearing with their dark skins, curly hair and wearing fur overcoats they referred to them as “Buffalo Soldiers.” The nickname “Buffalo Soldiers” was originally given to the 10th Cavalry by Cheyenne warriors out of respect for their fierce fighting in 1867. The Cheyenne Native American term used was actually “Wild Buffaloes”, which was translated to “Buffalo Soldiers.” In time, all African American Soldiers became known as “Buffalo Soldiers.” Despite second-class treatment these soldiers made up first-rate regiments of the highest caliber and had the lowest desertion rate in the Army.

http://www.buffalosoldierselpaso.org/
http://www.prints.com/art.php/Don_Stivers/?artist_id=2874

thecivilwarparlor:

Buffalo Soldiers-Painting By Don Stivers 

Troop A Tenth Cavalry led by Captain Nicholas A. Nolan at the Battle of Rattlesnake Springs,Texas August 6, 1880. Rattlesnake Springs is 40 miles north of present day Van Horn, Texas.

Troopers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry served with honor and distinction in the protection of settlers and stage coaches, stringing of telegraph lines and the mapping and exploration of Texas.

When the Plains Indians first saw the men of the 10th Cavalry wearing with their dark skins, curly hair and wearing fur overcoats they referred to them as “Buffalo Soldiers.” The nickname “Buffalo Soldiers” was originally given to the 10th Cavalry by Cheyenne warriors out of respect for their fierce fighting in 1867. The Cheyenne Native American term used was actually “Wild Buffaloes”, which was translated to “Buffalo Soldiers.” In time, all African American Soldiers became known as “Buffalo Soldiers.” Despite second-class treatment these soldiers made up first-rate regiments of the highest caliber and had the lowest desertion rate in the Army.

http://www.buffalosoldierselpaso.org/

http://www.prints.com/art.php/Don_Stivers/?artist_id=2874

Reblogged from revoltedstates  68 notes
revoltedstates:

thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater
In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.
Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.

Original Author: Unknown
Created: May 3, 1887
Medium: Photographic print
Virginia Historical Society


Note the one possibly African American man standing off to the right apart from everyone else. The US Colored Troops lost hundreds of men at the Crater, many of them murdered by Mahone’s Confederates after surrendering.

revoltedstates:

thecivilwarparlor:

Reunion At The Crater

In a photograph of reconciliation taken in 1887, former Confederate general William Mahone, at bottom center with long white beard, stands amid ex-Union soldiers from the 57th Massachusetts Regiment on the site where the Battle of the Crater had taken place on July 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia. That day, a massive explosion set off by Union soldiers in a tunnel beneath Confederate lines created a giant bowl-like depression in the ground. The 57th was one of the first regiments to enter the Crater during the ensuing battle. The attacking Union soldiers were then trapped, leaving them easy targets for Confederate soldiers.

Mahone successfully led the Confederate counterattack, and in the process captured members of the 57th Regiment. Survivors of the regiment are shown here sporting badges on their lapels. Mahone’s actions at the Crater made him a hero of the Confederacy and he was promoted to the rank of major general within a matter of days. When this photograph was taken in 1887, some twenty-three years after the battle, Mahone was nearing the end of his distinguished post-war political career. The previous year Mahone had lost his seat in the United States Senate as a member of the short-lived Readjuster Party; in 1889 he ran for governor of Virginia under the banner of the Republican Party and was defeated.

Original Author: Unknown

Created: May 3, 1887

Medium: Photographic print

Virginia Historical Society

Note the one possibly African American man standing off to the right apart from everyone else. The US Colored Troops lost hundreds of men at the Crater, many of them murdered by Mahone’s Confederates after surrendering.

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  58 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Jedediah Hotchkiss and Family- Confederate Map Maker
Jedediah Hotchkiss, the foremost military cartographer for the Confederacy during the Civil War, poses with his wife, Sara Ann Hotchkiss, and his daughters, Nellie and Anne, in this 1870 albumen silver carte-de-visite. This image was taken by B. M. Clinedinst, a photographer from Staunton, where the Hotchkiss family lived after the war.

Original Author: B. M. Clinedinst
Created: 1870
Medium: Albumen silver carte-de-visite
Virginia Historical Society

thecivilwarparlor:

Jedediah Hotchkiss and Family- Confederate Map Maker

Jedediah Hotchkiss, the foremost military cartographer for the Confederacy during the Civil War, poses with his wife, Sara Ann Hotchkiss, and his daughters, Nellie and Anne, in this 1870 albumen silver carte-de-visite. This image was taken by B. M. Clinedinst, a photographer from Staunton, where the Hotchkiss family lived after the war.

Original Author: B. M. Clinedinst

Created: 1870

Medium: Albumen silver carte-de-visite

Virginia Historical Society

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  58 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Jedediah Hotchkiss and Family- Confederate Map Maker
Jedediah Hotchkiss, the foremost military cartographer for the Confederacy during the Civil War, poses with his wife, Sara Ann Hotchkiss, and his daughters, Nellie and Anne, in this 1870 albumen silver carte-de-visite. This image was taken by B. M. Clinedinst, a photographer from Staunton, where the Hotchkiss family lived after the war.

Original Author: B. M. Clinedinst
Created: 1870
Medium: Albumen silver carte-de-visite
Virginia Historical Society

thecivilwarparlor:

Jedediah Hotchkiss and Family- Confederate Map Maker

Jedediah Hotchkiss, the foremost military cartographer for the Confederacy during the Civil War, poses with his wife, Sara Ann Hotchkiss, and his daughters, Nellie and Anne, in this 1870 albumen silver carte-de-visite. This image was taken by B. M. Clinedinst, a photographer from Staunton, where the Hotchkiss family lived after the war.

Original Author: B. M. Clinedinst

Created: 1870

Medium: Albumen silver carte-de-visite

Virginia Historical Society

Reblogged from mistycabin  58 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate
Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.
"His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”
Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).
Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate

Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.

  • "His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”

Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).

Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

Reblogged from revoltedstates  13 notes
revoltedstates:

roadhawg1:

A picture of a Boy Soldier. The boy looks to be six or seven years old. His is wearing a uniform. It appears that he is a combat soldier, not a drummer boy, in that he is wearing a Colt Revolver. It was created between 1860 and 1865 by Morris Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee.
The picture presents United States Civil War, Children at War.

This is the famous boy soldier Johnny Clem, the youngest NCO in US Army history, and possibly also one of the most photographed personalities of the Civil War.

revoltedstates:

roadhawg1:

A picture of a Boy Soldier. The boy looks to be six or seven years old. His is wearing a uniform. It appears that he is a combat soldier, not a drummer boy, in that he is wearing a Colt Revolver. It was created between 1860 and 1865 by Morris Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee.

The picture presents United States Civil War, Children at War.

This is the famous boy soldier Johnny Clem, the youngest NCO in US Army history, and possibly also one of the most photographed personalities of the Civil War.

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  53 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT- 
“This is a casual view of Union Army camp life,” During free moments, the men would clean up and be shaved.
CA. 1862, BY THOMAS C. ROCHE, PUBLISHED BY ANTHONY & CO. ROBIN STANFORD COLLECTION
The hair of the men in the Civil War was a major change in tactical warfare from the previous worldwide wars. For example, the wars in Europe prior to the American Civil War were fought with long hair, and in fact long hair was a valuable trait sought after in solders primarily for two reasons:
Long hair increased the physical appearance of men, giving them a raw look that would intimidate opponents. This very same fact of long hair increasing the bulk of a male was extrapolated to facial hair as facial hair was also left to grow fully to increase the male’s upper body bulk.
Long hair helped guard soldiers from the cold, and in Europe winter time is remarkably cold and bitter.
Long hair served to protect the skull against friction injuries or abrasive injuries.
However, during the Civil War the higher ranking officials would mandate that all soldiers be neatly trimmed as, by the time the war was starting, barbers had realized of the positive effect that good hygiene had on soldiers.
http://civilwartoday.net/
http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/civil-war-modern-medicine-110331.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT- 

“This is a casual view of Union Army camp life,” During free moments, the men would clean up and be shaved.

CA. 1862, BY THOMAS C. ROCHE, PUBLISHED BY ANTHONY & CO. ROBIN STANFORD COLLECTION

The hair of the men in the Civil War was a major change in tactical warfare from the previous worldwide wars. For example, the wars in Europe prior to the American Civil War were fought with long hair, and in fact long hair was a valuable trait sought after in solders primarily for two reasons:

  1. Long hair increased the physical appearance of men, giving them a raw look that would intimidate opponents. This very same fact of long hair increasing the bulk of a male was extrapolated to facial hair as facial hair was also left to grow fully to increase the male’s upper body bulk.
  2. Long hair helped guard soldiers from the cold, and in Europe winter time is remarkably cold and bitter.
  3. Long hair served to protect the skull against friction injuries or abrasive injuries.

However, during the Civil War the higher ranking officials would mandate that all soldiers be neatly trimmed as, by the time the war was starting, barbers had realized of the positive effect that good hygiene had on soldiers.

http://civilwartoday.net/

http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/civil-war-modern-medicine-110331.htm

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  108 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Officer’s Tent-National Park Service-Gettysburg National Military Park
The colorful covered bag next to the trunk is a carpetbag that was used as a suitcase by civilians and soldiers alike. Major G. L. Smith of the 107th New York Volunteers carried his spirits in the open wooden whiskey chest.
 Richard Jones, 201st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry used the small trunk during the war. Major Daniel Benner, 15th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, owned the larger trunk to the rear. 
General Lee’s Headquarter’s staff is said to have used the cot to the rear of the tent. They used wool blankets like the one shown. 
General Stonewall Jackson’s Headquarters staff may have used the cot [GETT 6068] in the front.
Gettysburg National Military Park-http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/gettex/exb/living_in_camp/officersTent_exb.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Officer’s Tent-National Park Service-Gettysburg National Military Park

The colorful covered bag next to the trunk is a carpetbag that was used as a suitcase by civilians and soldiers alike. Major G. L. Smith of the 107th New York Volunteers carried his spirits in the open wooden whiskey chest.

Richard Jones, 201st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry used the small trunk during the war. Major Daniel Benner, 15th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, owned the larger trunk to the rear.

General Lee’s Headquarter’s staff is said to have used the cot to the rear of the tent. They used wool blankets like the one shown.

General Stonewall Jackson’s Headquarters staff may have used the cot [GETT 6068] in the front.


Gettysburg National Military Park-http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/gettex/exb/living_in_camp/officersTent_exb.html