Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from mistycabin  54 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate
Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.
"His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”
Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).
Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

thecivilwarparlor:

Robert E. Lee - Fashion Plate

Robert E. Lee, age 38, poses with his son, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee, 8, around the year 1845. At the time, Lee was twenty years into his military career having entered West Point in 1825, graduated second in his class, and earned a place in the Corps of Engineers. Historian Emory M. Thomas has suggested that “Lee is quite the fashion plate” in this image.

  • "His long, large sideburns, striped trousers, counter–striped vest, and hand–in–coat pose all seem a bit more pretentious than Lee usually was.” Thomas’s desire to judge Lee’s dress in the context of his character fits into a long tradition that includes Lost Cause biographers who saw his crisp Civil War–era attire as a reflection of “his modest humility, simplicity, and gentleness.”

Lee’s son, for a time nicknamed Rooney, ended the Civil War as second in command of the Confederate cavalry. He later served in the Senate of Virginia (1875–1878) and the United States House of Representatives (1887–1891).

Source: Encyclopedia Virgina

Reblogged from revoltedstates  13 notes
revoltedstates:

roadhawg1:

A picture of a Boy Soldier. The boy looks to be six or seven years old. His is wearing a uniform. It appears that he is a combat soldier, not a drummer boy, in that he is wearing a Colt Revolver. It was created between 1860 and 1865 by Morris Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee.
The picture presents United States Civil War, Children at War.

This is the famous boy soldier Johnny Clem, the youngest NCO in US Army history, and possibly also one of the most photographed personalities of the Civil War.

revoltedstates:

roadhawg1:

A picture of a Boy Soldier. The boy looks to be six or seven years old. His is wearing a uniform. It appears that he is a combat soldier, not a drummer boy, in that he is wearing a Colt Revolver. It was created between 1860 and 1865 by Morris Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, Tennessee.

The picture presents United States Civil War, Children at War.

This is the famous boy soldier Johnny Clem, the youngest NCO in US Army history, and possibly also one of the most photographed personalities of the Civil War.

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  52 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT- 
“This is a casual view of Union Army camp life,” During free moments, the men would clean up and be shaved.
CA. 1862, BY THOMAS C. ROCHE, PUBLISHED BY ANTHONY & CO. ROBIN STANFORD COLLECTION
The hair of the men in the Civil War was a major change in tactical warfare from the previous worldwide wars. For example, the wars in Europe prior to the American Civil War were fought with long hair, and in fact long hair was a valuable trait sought after in solders primarily for two reasons:
Long hair increased the physical appearance of men, giving them a raw look that would intimidate opponents. This very same fact of long hair increasing the bulk of a male was extrapolated to facial hair as facial hair was also left to grow fully to increase the male’s upper body bulk.
Long hair helped guard soldiers from the cold, and in Europe winter time is remarkably cold and bitter.
Long hair served to protect the skull against friction injuries or abrasive injuries.
However, during the Civil War the higher ranking officials would mandate that all soldiers be neatly trimmed as, by the time the war was starting, barbers had realized of the positive effect that good hygiene had on soldiers.
http://civilwartoday.net/
http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/civil-war-modern-medicine-110331.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

SHAVE AND A HAIRCUT- 

“This is a casual view of Union Army camp life,” During free moments, the men would clean up and be shaved.

CA. 1862, BY THOMAS C. ROCHE, PUBLISHED BY ANTHONY & CO. ROBIN STANFORD COLLECTION

The hair of the men in the Civil War was a major change in tactical warfare from the previous worldwide wars. For example, the wars in Europe prior to the American Civil War were fought with long hair, and in fact long hair was a valuable trait sought after in solders primarily for two reasons:

  1. Long hair increased the physical appearance of men, giving them a raw look that would intimidate opponents. This very same fact of long hair increasing the bulk of a male was extrapolated to facial hair as facial hair was also left to grow fully to increase the male’s upper body bulk.
  2. Long hair helped guard soldiers from the cold, and in Europe winter time is remarkably cold and bitter.
  3. Long hair served to protect the skull against friction injuries or abrasive injuries.

However, during the Civil War the higher ranking officials would mandate that all soldiers be neatly trimmed as, by the time the war was starting, barbers had realized of the positive effect that good hygiene had on soldiers.

http://civilwartoday.net/

http://news.discovery.com/history/us-history/civil-war-modern-medicine-110331.htm

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  107 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Officer’s Tent-National Park Service-Gettysburg National Military Park
The colorful covered bag next to the trunk is a carpetbag that was used as a suitcase by civilians and soldiers alike. Major G. L. Smith of the 107th New York Volunteers carried his spirits in the open wooden whiskey chest.
 Richard Jones, 201st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry used the small trunk during the war. Major Daniel Benner, 15th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, owned the larger trunk to the rear. 
General Lee’s Headquarter’s staff is said to have used the cot to the rear of the tent. They used wool blankets like the one shown. 
General Stonewall Jackson’s Headquarters staff may have used the cot [GETT 6068] in the front.
Gettysburg National Military Park-http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/gettex/exb/living_in_camp/officersTent_exb.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Officer’s Tent-National Park Service-Gettysburg National Military Park

The colorful covered bag next to the trunk is a carpetbag that was used as a suitcase by civilians and soldiers alike. Major G. L. Smith of the 107th New York Volunteers carried his spirits in the open wooden whiskey chest.

Richard Jones, 201st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry used the small trunk during the war. Major Daniel Benner, 15th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, owned the larger trunk to the rear.

General Lee’s Headquarter’s staff is said to have used the cot to the rear of the tent. They used wool blankets like the one shown.

General Stonewall Jackson’s Headquarters staff may have used the cot [GETT 6068] in the front.


Gettysburg National Military Park-http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/gettex/exb/living_in_camp/officersTent_exb.html

Members from the Col. Hecker Camp #443 (SUVCW) participated in a living history day at the Gustav Koerner House in Belleville, Illinois, on Saturday April 5, 2014.

Gustav Philipp Koerner, also spelled Gustave or Gustavus Koerner (20 November 1809 –  9 April 1896) was a revolutionary, journalist, lawyer, politician, judge, and statesman in Illinois and Germany and a Colonel of the U.S. Army who was a confessed enemy of slavery. He married on 17 June 1836 in Belleville Sophia Dorothea Engelmann (16 November 1815 – 1 March 1888),[5] they had 9 children.[6] He belonged to the co-founders and was one of the first members of the Grand Old Party; and he was a close confidant of Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary Todd and had essential portion on his nomination and election for president in 1860.

The event was held to celebrate the City of Belleville’s 200th anniversary. More living history event are scheduled throughout the year.

Koerner’s House is currently under renovation by The Belleville Heritage Society.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Koerner

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  39 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Hospital Gingerbread- Soldiers Fighting For Food
Gingerbread was a favorite when it was available, and a comfort food often offered to wounded soldiers in field hospitals. One diary entry of a Civil War nurse described how, after spending the day bathing and bandaging soldiers wounds, she found a sutler’s stand and bought a supply of gingerbread which she called “a singular food for sick men.”
However, Mrs. Levins pointed out, the conflict’s food history “was not all about goodness and light. During the war the four items that caused the most food-related fights within the ranks were bread, meat, apples and pickles. Documents record that soldiers were court martialed, beaten almost to death, and even shot over apples as they went foraging. These were desperate times when large numbers of men often lived just this side of starvation for long periods of time.”
Credit To: http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews112.shtml

thecivilwarparlor:

Hospital Gingerbread- Soldiers Fighting For Food

Gingerbread was a favorite when it was available, and a comfort food often offered to wounded soldiers in field hospitals. One diary entry of a Civil War nurse described how, after spending the day bathing and bandaging soldiers wounds, she found a sutler’s stand and bought a supply of gingerbread which she called “a singular food for sick men.”

However, Mrs. Levins pointed out, the conflict’s food history “was not all about goodness and light. During the war the four items that caused the most food-related fights within the ranks were bread, meat, apples and pickles. Documents record that soldiers were court martialed, beaten almost to death, and even shot over apples as they went foraging. These were desperate times when large numbers of men often lived just this side of starvation for long periods of time.”

Credit To: http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews112.shtml

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  243 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Surgeon Mary Walker
Dr. Walker Is The Only Woman Ever Awarded The Congressional Medal Of Honor.
As the Civil War broke out, Dr. Walker traveled to Washington to petition for a commission in the Army as a surgeon. Denied the commission, she served for several months as a contract surgeon. When she Walker was finally appointed assistant surgeon in the Army of the Cumberland, she made herself a slightly modified officer’s uniform that gave her more mobility when treating soldiers and working in field hospitals than women’s clothing of the day.
Dr. Walker was then appointed assistant surgeon of the 52nd Ohio Infantry. She continually crossed Confederate lines to treat civilians. Although she later fought rumors that she was not a qualified doctor, but a Union spy, it is presumed that she passed information during that time. Dr. Walker was taken prisoner in 1864 by Confederate troops and imprisoned in Richmond for four months until she was exchanged, with two dozen other Union doctors, for 17 Confederate surgeons.
In 1917, when criteria for awarding the Congressional Medal of Honor changed, Dr. Walker’s award was rescinded along with more than 900 others. She refused to return it, however, and wore it always. President Jimmy Carter restored the award to her in 1977. As a result of her service to the Union during the Civil War, Mary Walker was paid $766.16 and provided a monthly pension lower than those of most war widows.
http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/rr/s01/cw/students/leeann/historyandcollections/history/pathbreakers/marywalker.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Surgeon Mary Walker

Dr. Walker Is The Only Woman Ever Awarded The Congressional Medal Of Honor.

As the Civil War broke out, Dr. Walker traveled to Washington to petition for a commission in the Army as a surgeon. Denied the commission, she served for several months as a contract surgeon. When she Walker was finally appointed assistant surgeon in the Army of the Cumberland, she made herself a slightly modified officer’s uniform that gave her more mobility when treating soldiers and working in field hospitals than women’s clothing of the day.

Dr. Walker was then appointed assistant surgeon of the 52nd Ohio Infantry. She continually crossed Confederate lines to treat civilians. Although she later fought rumors that she was not a qualified doctor, but a Union spy, it is presumed that she passed information during that time. Dr. Walker was taken prisoner in 1864 by Confederate troops and imprisoned in Richmond for four months until she was exchanged, with two dozen other Union doctors, for 17 Confederate surgeons.

In 1917, when criteria for awarding the Congressional Medal of Honor changed, Dr. Walker’s award was rescinded along with more than 900 others. She refused to return it, however, and wore it always. President Jimmy Carter restored the award to her in 1977. As a result of her service to the Union during the Civil War, Mary Walker was paid $766.16 and provided a monthly pension lower than those of most war widows.

http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/rr/s01/cw/students/leeann/historyandcollections/history/pathbreakers/marywalker.html

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor  38 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division
The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”
http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division

The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”

http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html